Joint Call for Papers from the Political Economy of Work and Social Reproduction Working Groups

IIPPE 9th Annual Conference in Political Economy

Pula, Croatia

Joint Call for Papers from the Political Economy of Work and Social Reproduction Working Groups

The Political Economy of Work and Social Reproduction Working Groups invite you to submit proposals for individual papers, themed panels or streams of panels related to our lines of inquiry. These may include theoretical and empirical contributions that focus primarily on the relationship between work and social reproduction. Previous IIPPE conferences have highlighted the clear overlaps and synergies in many contributions on the Political Economy of Work and on Social Reproduction. Our aim at the Pula conference is therefore to deepen and strengthen such synergies. In this spirit, we welcome contributions on the following themes:

  • The relationship between the productive and reproductive sphere
  • Feminist political economy of work
  • Gender, labour movements and capitalism
  • Conceptualising and measuring value in productive and reproductive work
  • Domestic labour, migration and global capitalism
  • The care crisis under capitalism
  • The political economy of time and time-use in relation to work and social reproduction
  • Empirically grounded discussions of concrete, abstract, private, social and caring labour
  • Emotional labour, value, and the political economy of production and social reproduction
  • Gender and inequality in the workplace: the gender pay gap, occupational segregation and other dimensions of gender and inequality in work
  • Debating the feminization of labour

We encourage the submission of panel proposals (consisting of up to four presentations) as an opportunity to showcase the work of study groups in greater depth than is possible in single presentations.

Papers and panel proposals can be submitted on iippe.org by 15 March 2018, ticking the Social Reproduction and/or Political Economy of Work Working Groups as part of your submission.

Hannah Bargawi

Matthew Cole

Sara Stevano

A Note on Fieldwork

MI-BW-HO-BR-AH-01

A key element of the fieldwork involves the contrasting narratives of management and workers with regard to conflict and cooperation in the workplace. Through exploring contrasting accounts between workers and mangers at the sectorial level, I will be able to articulate the politics of ‘service’ production in the workplace. From the data, I hope to be able to detail different perceptions of the labour process, as well as the modes of conflict and cooperation.I hope to build on materialist theories of the ’structured antagonism’ as well as the political dimensions of the value-form literature.

With regard to workers’ experience in the hospitality industry, I’ve found the prime mover of the employment relation is whether the contracted staff are agency or in-house. The secondary factor which determines different conditions are then between staff who receive remittances from the trunc system and those that don’t. The trunc system is a major source of conflict. Despite working for different companies, workers across the industry have remarkably similar conditions and issues. Each interviewee has so far given both a portrait of their workplace, as well as highlighted key conflicts over the course of their employment. It is clear that the rhetoric and strategy of managers contrasts with many of the accounts from workers themselves. However, this is most stark when they are a member of a union. Unionised workers often tell me that they speak up and aren’t afraid to say when things aren’t right. Most of the nonunion workers I’ve talked to try to adopt the views of management and often internalise them – the ’new spirit of capitalism’ is relevant here as well as Hochschild’s ‘managed heart’.

At the professional level, workers’ dissenting narratives are often missing. For example, the British Hospitality Association – the main industrial lobbying body in the UK – provides a wealth of literature on the industry and argues for its economic significance for the national economy. However, they ostentatiously omit accounts of the reality of work for most nonsupervisory and non managerial staff. Participants’ accounts of workplace tensions and the various tactics that mangers use to suppress dissent – from intimidation to wage theft – will be used as a counterpoint to the managerial narratives that I have collected so far, which fail to recognise the same problems at work. Most managers give a fairly glossy picture of their workplace despite the fact that the industry is plagued by violations and low pay.

A research agenda for Marxian conceptions of value and the political economy of ‘service’ work

A research agenda for Marxian conceptions of value and the political economy of ‘service’ work

Currently, there is resurgence in scholarship on Marxian conceptions of value. However, much of the discourse has remained within the realms of heterodox economics, political economy, and philosophy. I would like to set out a new line of inquiry, which shifts the aims of this research from the abstract and quantitative toward the concrete and qualitative. Following this line, we will investigate aspects of the Marxian conception of value in relation to the way capitalism actually functions. This entails combining detailed examinations of the real-world experiences of work with a value-[in]formed political economic critique of employment relations.

Marx’s theory of value gives us a tool for understanding the dynamic process of capitalist exploitation that overcomes the fragmentation of that experience. To quote Diane Elson:

What Marx’s theory of value does is provide a basis for showing the link between money relations and labour process relations in the process of exploitation. The process of exploitation is actually a unity; and the money relations and labour process relations which are experienced as two discretely distinct kinds of relation, are in fact onesided reflections of particular aspects of this unity. Neither money relations nor labour process relations in themselves constitute capitalist exploitation; and neither one can be changed very much without accompanying changes in the other… Marx’s theory of value is able to show this unity of money and labour process because it does not pose production and circulation as two separate, discretely distinct spheres and does not pose value and price as discretely distinct variables. (‘The Value theory of Labour’ in Value: The Representation of Labour in Capitalism: p. 172)

Through the use of a value-form analytic, scholars and activists alike will be able to develop novel political insights into contemporary relations of production and reproduction, as well as conceptualise emergent forms of work – from ‘services’ to creative industries.

Lines of inquiry might include:

  • accounting for productive and unproductive labour
  • the relations of concrete and abstract labour
  • differential and absolute ground rent and labour
  • the meaning of ‘services’ and ‘deindustrialisation’
  • aesthetic/affective labour and value
  • knowledge/intellectual labour and value
  • the value-form and global value chains
  • the value-form and the social construction of work
  • the value-form and the labours of reproduction
  • financialisation, value, and employment relations

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The following is a working bibliography of articles and texts that I’ve found helpful in understanding Marxian conceptions of value in relation to work:

Articles:

Books: